LB644 Advanced Environmental Law

One thing we do know about the threat of climate change is that the cost of adjustment only grows the longer it’s left unaddressed.

– Jay Weatherill

A warm welcome to my session of LB644 Advanced Environmental Law.

This session is aimed at offering students an opportunity to explore the public perspective of climate change and energy law. In particular, I expect students to familiarise themselves with the concepts, principles or legal instruments on:

  • anthropocentric climate change;
  • petroleum law;
  • renewable energy promotion law;
  • energy efficiency promotion law; and
  • climate change law.

Readings

There is no particular textbook designated for this session. However, texts listed below are recommended for general reading.

  • Callum Hill, An introduction to sustainable resource use (earthscan, 2011).
  • Patricia Park, International law for energy and the environment Second Edition (CRC, 2013), pp75-105, 131-155 and 189-272.
  • Kimberly K Smith, Powering our future: an energy sourcebook for sustainable living (iUniverse, 2005), pp9-96.
  • Jacqueline Lang Weaver, “Sustainable development in the petroleum sector” in Adrian J Bradbrook and Richard L Ottinger (eds), Energy law and sustainable development (IUCN, 2003), pp45-77.
  • Ricardo Pereira, The exploration and exploitation of energy resources in international law” in Karen E Makuch and Ricardo Pereira (eds), Environmental and energy law (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), pp197-224.
  • Kimberly K Smith, Powering our future: an energy sourcebook for sustainable living (iUniverse, 2005), pp9-96.
  • Godfrey Boyle, Bob Everett and Janet Ramage (eds), Energy systems and sustainability: power for a sustainable future (Oxford University Press, 2004).
  • Amos Salvador, Energy: a historical perspective and 21st Century forecast (The American Association of Petroleum Geologists, 2006), pp3-32 and 131-147.
  • Kenneth S Deffeyes, Beyond oil: the view from Hubbert’s peak (Hill and Wang, 2005).
  • Tina Hunter and John Chandler, Petroleum law in Australia (LexisNexis, 2013).
  • Greg Gordon, “Petroleum licensing” in Greg Gordon, John Paterson and Emre Üşenmez (eds), Oil and gas law – current practice and emerging trends (Dundee, 2011), pp65-109.
  • John Paterson, “Health and safety at work offshore” in Greg Gordon, John Paterson and Emre Üşenmez (eds), Oil and gas law – current practice and emerging trends (Dundee, 2011), pp187-230.
  • John Paterson, “Decommissioning of offshore oil and gas installations” in Greg Gordon, John Paterson and Emre Üşenmez (eds), Oil and gas law – current practice and emerging trends (Dundee, 2011), pp285-329.
  • Martin Ewan, “Law and technology in the oilfield” in Greg Gordon, John Paterson and Emre Üşenmez (eds), Oil and gas law – current practice and emerging trends (Dundee, 2011), pp499-521.
  • Tim Cockerill, “Carbon capture and storage technologies – an overview and some key issues” in Karen E Makuch and Ricardo Pereira (eds), Environmental and energy law (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), pp257-269.
  • Zen A Makuch, Slavina Z Georgieva and Behdeen Oraee-Mizamani, “Carbon capture and storage liability” in Karen E Makuch and Ricardo Pereira (eds), Environmental and energy law (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), pp270-287.
  • Michael Faure and Marjan Peeters (eds), Climate change liability (Edward Elgar, 2011).

Additional documents or legal instruments may be provided at each class.

I expect students to prepare themselves by exploring relevant texts and legal instruments before coming to each class in this session.

Classes

There are five classes in this session, spanning from March 5 to April 2, 2019.

Assessment

I expect all students to attend and participate in every single class in this session, as their performances shall be individually or collectively assessed against their contribution each week.

To ensure the satisfactory learning outcome of students in my session, I shall give 5 marks of attendance to each student who presents themselves at each class.

I shall further grant up to 15 marks against their performance in each class, i.e. the quality or quantity of their participation. Such marks shall be allocated to students either individually or collectively, depending on the nature of activities each week.

The assessment marks of this session can be viewed here.

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